unnamed-1-620x350Ali (Alija) Krasnići was born in 1952 in Crkvena Vodica, a town near Obilić in Kosovo. He never questioned his identity as Rom and his mother tongue, Gurbet-Romani; they were a natural and central part of his life. In this sense, Krasnići is a tradition-conscious Rom. However, he does not consider the traditional values of his forefathers nor Romani as something static which cannot be subject to change.

Nevertheless, in the 1960s and 70s, Krasnići’s studies at  the Faculty of Law in Obilić equaled a breach of a taboo. He quickly realized that people thought very little of Roma and they knew even less about Romani culture; even then, what was “known” was a gross and incorrect stereotype. It was this experience which later led Krasnići to publish his books in multiple languages – usually Romani and Serbian, though sometimes also in English.

In the years and decades that followed, Ali Krasnići became one of the best known Roma authors in former Yugoslavia. Until now, he has written and published more than 40 books, is represented in numerous anthologies, has written articles for the radio and radio plays. He was awarded several of the most important prizes for his literary work. He is one of the few authors who write prose in Rromanes. It is believed that Romani is a lesser language (smaller lexicon and lack of abstract terms), but Krasnići sought to challenge this idea by writing more than poetry or drama.

6283864-MHis main concern, which he deals with in a literary form, is depicting the life of the Roma in all its facets. He deals with suffering, privation, poverty and need, but also with the longings, the happiness, and the every-day pleasures of the Roma in his region.

Books [unavailable]:

    • (1995) Rromani kalji paramići. Kragujevac
    • (1998) Iripe ano Đuvdipe. Kragujevac.
    • (2000a) Antologija e Điljenđi katar o Jasenovac. Kragujevac
    • (2000b) Rromani mahlava. Kragujevac
    • (2001) Lord, turn me into an ant! Gypsy fairy tales from Kosovo and Metohia, Beograd
    • (2002) Đuvdimase bibahhtaljimate. Kraguevac
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